Burmese version of “The Importance of Individualism” (2016)

burmese_2

 

DOWNLOAD HERE: Timo Schmitz (author), Shwe Zin (translator): The Importance of Individualism, Burmese Version (2016)

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Timo Schmitz: “Pancasila – Indonesia’s Juche Idea or an authentic state philosophy?” (2016) [PDF]

This is Part 26 of my philosophical series “Individualism between Moral and Virtues, Government and Religion”.

Pancasila is the Indonesian state philosophy and basis for the country’s political mentality. After World War II, Indonesia tried to become independent quickly, to avoid being possibly reclaimed as colony. Thus, the state reason was created in a very short time, and popular criticism points out that the political principle was more or less empty and later filled with content. As pointed out in previous parts of this series, North Korea’s state ideology – Juche Idea – was also introduced before the philosophical content was created, and so we might ask, is Indonesia’s Pancasila just another Juche Idea or an authentic state theory? Download the article below to find it out.

 

DOWNLOAD HERE:

“Pancasila – Indonesia’s Juche Idea or an authentic state philosophy?”

Timo Schmitz: “The radical Nihilism of Fumiko Kaneko” (2016) [PDF]

This is Part 25 of my philosophical series “Individualism between Moral and Virtues, Government and Religion”.

Fumiko Kaneko (1903-1926) was a Japanese political activist and philosopher. She developed a radical view on nihilism, based on her own experiences, as she was abandoned by her own family, had to struggle for education, and was mistreated by her relatives in Korea, where she got to see the misery that the Japanese colonial rule imposed on Korea. In 1922, she was introduced to Western philosophy by her closest friend, such as Max Stirner and Friedrich Nietzsche, but also Mikhail Artsybashev and Peter Kropotkin. Kaneko fought for gaining a career which was very restricted and almost impossible for women at that time, rebelling against the social conventions and her oppression. In 1926, Fumiko  Kaneko committed suicide in her prison cell.

 

DOWNLOAD HERE:

“The radical Nihilism of Fumiko Kaneko” (2016)